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Shots - Health Blog
1:36 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Timing Of Birth Control Coverage May Differ For Students, Profs

Sandra Fluke, a third-year law student at Georgetown University and former president of the Students for Reproductive Justice group there, testifies during a hearing before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee last month in Washington.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Could Georgetown University students like Sandra Fluke have to wait an extra year for free birth control?

There's a reason to ask the question.

Fluke, in case you missed it somehow, is the law student who testified before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee last month about the importance of providing free contraceptive services to students and others at religiously affiliated institutions.

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The Two-Way
1:30 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

With Economy 'Expanding Moderately,' Fed Leaves Interest Rates Unchanged

Originally published on Tue March 13, 2012 1:31 pm

Citing an economy that is "expanding moderately," an improving labor market and subdued inflation — but a housing sector that "remains depressed" — the Federal Reserve just announced it is holding to its current policy on short-term interest rates.

The central bank's policymakers also said they expect "moderate economic growth over coming quarters" and that the jobless rate will continue to "decline gradually."

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Why Praise For An Olive Garden Turned Marilyn Hagerty Into A Star

Her fame has taken Marilyn Hagerty to New York City to be on the TV networks. And her newspaper has created a blog just for following her travels.
Grand Forks Herald

The sudden national fame for 85-year-old North Dakota newspaper columnist Marilyn Hagerty because she wrote last week that the new Olive Garden restaurant in Grand Forks is "impressive ... welcoming ... [and] is the largest and most beautiful restaurant now operating" in the city reinforces two things for this blogger:

1. Almost everyone loves a story about someone who seems to be just so darn nice and who's still going strong at an age when many of us will just be glad to still be around.

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The Record
1:00 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Cotton Mather's 'Kontiki,' The Album That Won't Go Gently

Cotton Mather (from left): Dana Myzer, Josh Gravelin, Whit Williams and Robert Harrison.
Todd Wolfson Courtesy of Fanatic Promotion

Originally published on Thu March 15, 2012 12:44 pm

More than a decade ago, an album came out recorded mostly on cassette in a house, never released on a major label — and until last month it had been out of print for almost that long. When Noel Gallagher of Oasis heard it, he declared it "amazing," and The Guardian called it "the best album The Beatles never recorded."

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It's All Politics
12:37 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Santorum Gets A Lift From Anti-Abortion Group

Supporters of Rick Santorum, organized by the anti-abortion Susan B. Anthony List, spoke outside the Georgia State Capitol Building on March 5.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

GOP presidential hopeful Rick Santorum has been getting help from anti-abortion group Susan B. Anthony List as he campaigns this primary season, so far receiving nearly $500,000 in ads and other support.

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Remembrances
12:11 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

F. Sherwood Rowland, Warned Of Aerosol's Danger

F. Sherwood Rowland, pictured here in 1989, was one of three chemists who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize for chemistry for work on discovering chemicals that deplete the Earth's ozone layer.
University of California AP

The man who warned us that aerosol spray-cans could destroy the earth's protective ozone layer has died.

F. Sherwood Rowland, better known as Sherry Rowland, was a Nobel-prize winning chemist at the University of California, Irvine. And he didn't just keep to the laboratory: He successfully advocated for a ban on ozone-destroying chemicals called CFCs.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue March 13, 2012

If You're Hiding It From Your Wife, That Payday Loan's 'Gotta Be Bad News'

A payday store in Madison, Wis.,
Ryan J. Foley AP

Originally published on Tue March 13, 2012 11:53 am

  • Petula Dvorak talks with guest host Allison Keyes

Much has been reported in recent years about payday loans and the huge fees and sky-high interest charges that borrowers can rack up if they use such services.

And though their demise has been predicted, they live on.

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NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Is The Voting Rights Act Still Necessary?

An effort is underway by at least two states to challenge key provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory voting practices. As voters in Alabama and Mississippi go to the polls to vote in their states' primaries, host Michel Martin discusses the act with former U.S. Congressman Artur Davis.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Need Fast Cash? Beware Of Triple Digit Interest

Payday loan companies promise you fast cash before your next paycheck. It may seem like a good idea, but a small loan can lead to high interest rates and mountains of debt. Guest host Allison Keyes talks with Washington Post columnist Petula Dvorak who reported on how one man's $1,500 loan could have ended up costing him $18,000.

NPR Story
11:00 am
Tue March 13, 2012

Post Office: Scammers Targeting Elderly By Mail

Financial scams are on the rise. Last year, Americans filed more than 1.5 million fraud complaints. Officials at the U.S. Postal Inspection Service say the elderly are particularly vulnerable and the agency has made combating fraud one of its top priorities. Guest host Alison Keyes speaks with Pete Rendina of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.

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