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Religion
4:54 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Rabbis Diversify To Connect To Students; Just Don't Bring Up Israel

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 9:46 pm

Rabbi Evan Goodman runs Hillel, the campus Jewish center, at the University of California, Santa Barbara. In recent years, he's had to rethink his job.

"Years past, when I was in college," he says, the Jewish organization "was a rabbi at a campus that put up a schedule of classes ... and drew the same 10 students to everything all year."

These days, chances are good that half the Jewish students he works with have a parent who's not Jewish. One in three of them says Judaism isn't his or her religion.

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Business
4:54 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Pressure To Act Unethically Looms Over Wall Street, Survey Finds

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 6:06 pm

A new survey of financial professionals tends to confirm the widely held belief that the financial industry has an ethics problem.

Among the more than 1,200 financial professionals in the U.S. and Britain who were surveyed, about half the respondents believe their competitors in the industry have behaved unethically or illegally to gain an advantage in the market.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

FTC And States Sue Sham Cancer Charities

Four cancer "charities" and their operators have been charged with bilking more than $187 million from consumers. The Federal Trade Commission, along with each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia, says the charities claimed to be providing assistance to cancer patients, but the donations were in reality benefiting only "the perpetrators, their families and friends, and fundraisers."

Here's NPR's Jim Zarroli's report on the suit:

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The Salt
4:11 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

What Does 'Raw' Mean? When It Comes To Almonds, You Might Be Surprised

Lesley McClurg Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 5:15 pm

When you're talking about almonds, "raw" may not mean what you think.

All California almonds — which would be virtually all the almonds in the country — are either heat-pasteurized or treated with a fumigant. The processes, which have been required by law since 2007, are intended to prevent foodborne illness. But almond aficionados say the treatments taint the flavor and mislead consumers.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Wanna Go To Fit City? List Ranks America's 50 Fittest Metro Areas

People exercise along the Reflecting Pool on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.; the metro area was ranked as America's fittest city for the second year in a row.
Andrew Harnik The Washington Times/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 8:44 am

The new American Fitness Index is out, with some good news and bad news. Five metro areas fell five or more slots; nine others rose by five or more places. The rankings tally several criteria, from rates of smoking, diabetes and obesity to access to parks.

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

LA City Council Votes To Raise Minimum Wage To $15 By 2020

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 3:47 pm

The Los Angeles City Council voted today to raise the hourly minimum wage in the second-largest U.S. city from $9 to $15 by 2020 — a move that would cover as many as 800,000 people.

The Los Angeles Times has more on the vote:

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NPR Ed
3:39 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful ... This Great Teacher Abides By The Scout Law

Romy Vasquez leads the boys in drills ahead of an upcoming Eagle Scout ceremony.
Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 10:32 am

Only a small number of Boy Scouts make Eagle Scout.

The feat is even harder when you come from inner-city poverty.

Yet for 27 years, Romy Vasquez has successfully encouraged boys from South Central Los Angeles to become Scouts, and he has seen more than a dozen members of Troop 780 go on to reach scouting's highest rank.

His pitch: You want to be in a gang? Scouting is the biggest gang in the world.

"It's global," he tells the Scouts. "We got some in Japan, China, Israel, all over. So guess what? You belong to BSA!"

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

As Congress Haggles Over Patriot Act, We Answer 6 Basic Questions

The National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 7:18 pm

The rest of the month is setting up to be pretty dramatic in the Senate.

A key section of the Patriot Act — the part of law the White House uses to conduct mass surveillance on the call records of Americans — is set to expire June 1. That leaves legislators with a big decision to make: Rewrite the statute to outlaw or modify the practice or extend the statute and let the National Security Agency continue with its work.

As the Senate debates, we answer six questions that'll get you up to speed:

1. What's Congress debating here?

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Around the Nation
3:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

Clinical Psychologist To Head Chicago's Cook County Jail

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 6:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Politics
3:30 pm
Tue May 19, 2015

State Department To Release Hillary Clinton Emails By January 2016

Originally published on Tue May 19, 2015 6:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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