Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Possible Listeria Contamination Leads To Recalls In 25 States

Fears of possible listeria contamination are forcing grocery stores in 25 states to pull refrigerated foods from shelves. Taylor Farms of Jessup, Md., is recalling products that include salad kits with packets of dressing due to concerns of a possible contamination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

NPR's Jim Hawk filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Cardinals Get A Walk-Off World Series Win On Bizarre Play

Home plate umpire Dana DeMuth points to third base, where an obstruction call awarded the St. Louis Cardinals' Allen Craig home plate — and the winning run in Game 3 of the World Series — Saturday night. Boston Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Koji Uehara were dismayed by the call.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 1:27 pm

  • Hear Tom Goldman's Report On 'Weekend Edition'

Game 3 of the World Series ended in unusual fashion Saturday night, as a ninth-inning obstruction call on Boston third baseman Will Middlebrooks resulted in umpires awarding a base to St. Louis' Allen Craig — bringing the winning run home and putting the Cardinals ahead in the series, 2-1.

It's reportedly the first time an obstruction call has ended a World Series game. And it brought an end to a nearly four-hour contest in which the Red Sox had twice rallied from two-run deficits — most recently in the eighth inning.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

World Series Game 3: Lineups Shift For Games In St. Louis

Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz, a designated hitter in American League ballparks, played first base in St. Louis during the 2004 World Series. He'll do the same for Game 3 of the series Saturday.
Al Bello Getty Images

The all-tied World Series resumes tonight, with Game 3 between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Boston Red Sox. Ahead of the game Saturday, the main storyline centers on the change of venue to St. Louis, where the Red Sox, and their pitchers, will have to adapt to National League rules.

The shift gives the Cardinals something of an edge, at least for now, as NPR's Tom Goldman reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Marcia Wallace, Longtime 'Simpsons' Cast Member, Dies At 70

Actress Marcia Wallace has died at age 70. She was a fixture on American television for decades, thanks to long-running roles on The Bob Newhart Show and The Simpsons.
Angela Weiss Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 7:46 pm

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Egyptian Court Dismisses Breach Of Trust Lawsuit Against ElBaradei

An Egyptian lawsuit against former interim vice president of Mohammed ElBaradei, seen here in 2010, has been dismissed. ElBaradei is not currently living in Egypt.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 8:44 pm

A lawsuit against Egypt's former interim vice president has been dismissed, as a misdemeanor court says there weren't sufficient grounds for a suit against Mohammed ElBaradei to proceed. He had been accused of betraying the national trust.

The lawsuit was filed by a law professor who opposed the rule of President Mohammed Morsi, according to Gulf News. ElBaradei had been a co-leader of the secular National Salvation Front, which supported Morsi's ouster this summer.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Sat October 26, 2013

U.S. Spying Update: Europe Fumes And Protesters Rally In D.C.

News of U.S. surveillance in Europe has met with distrust and anger; officials are heading to Washington to discuss matters next week. Here, members of an artists' group paint a mural called "Surveillance of the Fittest" on a wall in Cologne, Germany, on Thursday.
Frank Augstein AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 8:43 pm

Anger, distrust and possible punishments are the defining themes of Europe's reaction to news that a U.S. spy agency monitored the phone calls of millions of European citizens and some world leaders. The details are the latest to emerge from leaks attributed to former National Security Agency contract worker Edward Snowden.

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Sat October 26, 2013

Iran Hangs 16 Prisoners In Reported Retaliation For Border Attack

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 8:37 pm

Iran has hanged 16 militant prisoners in what is being called retaliation for an attack that killed more than a dozen Iranian guards near the country's border with Pakistan, according to Iran's state-affiliated media. The country is also blaming Pakistan for what it calls lax security.

NPR's Peter Kenyon filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Sat October 26, 2013

Saudi Women Get Behind Wheel For 'Drive-In' Protest

An image taken from a video from the Oct. 26 driving campaign shows a Saudi woman driving in Riyadh. A Saudi woman said she drove to the grocery store without being stopped or harassed by police as part of a protest against a ban on female drivers.
AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 7:59 pm

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The Two-Way
5:05 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Sony Explains Why Its PlayStation 4 Costs $1,845 In Brazil

Sony announced U.S. and European prices for its new PlayStation 4 at a news conference this summer. The game system will cost some $1,845 in Brazil, angering fans.
Eric Thayer Getty Images

Sony's new PlayStation 4 won't be on store shelves until next month, but the gaming console has already raised eyebrows in Brazil, after reports that it would cost 3,999 Brazilian real — or about $1,845 at today's exchange rate.

The company says the steep cost isn't a case of price gouging, but instead a sign of Brazil's heavy taxes and fees on imported electronics.

The game system will be released in the United States on Nov. 15 and in countries including Brazil later that month. Large retailers in the U.S. will offer the PS4 at a base price of around $400.

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Cuba To Phase Out Two-Peso Currency System

A woman displays Cuban pesos, or CUP (right) and the more valuable convertible pesos, or CUC (left), in Havana Tuesday. Raul Castro's government announced that it will begin unifying the two currencies.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Cuba will end the two-currency system it has used for nearly 20 years. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Cuba has used either American currency or a peso that's pegged to the dollar alongside its national peso.

The monetary unification will phase out a system that has become a symbol of exclusivity and foreign wealth. Many products that are imported into the country can be bought only with the dollar-based convertible peso. But most Cubans are paid in the standard peso, which is worth just a fraction of the other currency.

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