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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

This summer, U.S. archer Khatuna Lorig hopes to return to the Olympic Games. But she's already helped put archery into The Hunger Games this spring — by training the film's star, Jennifer Lawrence, to shoot. In the kill-or-be-killed competition in the film drawn from Suzanne Collins' book, Lawrence's character, Katniss Everdeen, relies on her ability with a bow. And Lorig worked with the actress to ensure she had proper form. "[Lawrence is] the best ambassador we have, a sort of Kevin Costner...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xKRBkBBEP0 The huge solar storm that NASA detected hurtling toward Earth hit our planet at 5:42 a.m. EST Thursday. So far, there have been no reports of major power or communications disruptions. The storm's magnetic fields are oriented in a way that's "been opposite of what is needed to cause the strongest storming," says the Space Weather Prediction Center . So, the main effect of this storm, which the AP calls the largest in five years, may only be to paint...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLq5oW28glw The sun ejected two huge solar flares Tuesday, and NASA says that we here on Earth may notice the effects of magnetic fields and ionized gases that it estimates will arrive around 1:25 a.m. ET Thursday. So, if you detect some electronic interference — say, your GPS doesn't work right — blame it on the sun. In NASA's video of the mass ejections of solar matter, they look powerful, even angry — like massive solar blisters. As NASA says, "One of the...

Brazil took a step toward relaxing its strict ban on alcohol at soccer stadiums Tuesday, responding to World Cup organizers' concerns. The Federation International de Football Association is pushing for the change so it can make Budweiser the "Official Beer of the FIFA World Cup" when Brazil hosts the event in 2014. Late Tuesday, a special committee voted 15-9 to approve the sale of alcoholic beverages at Brazil's soccer stadiums during the 2014 World Cup, as well as the 2013 Confederations...

The elite athletes who travel to London for this summer's Olympic Games will include petite gymnasts, huge wrestlers — and elite horses, which compete in dressage and other events. Getting these strong and delicate animals to the Olympics is no job for an amateur. In fact, it's the job of Tim Dutta, who owns an international horse transport company. "It's quite a logistical feat," Dutta tells Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep. Dutta, who has been moving horses around the world for some 25...

News that Google will place its dozens of services under one privacy policy — a change that also means the company will compile and collate each user's data from all those products — has some of its customers scrambling to restrict their privacy settings before the new policy goes into effect on March 1. Of course, not everyone who relies on Google for Web search, email or YouTube is concerned about the pending change. Some don't care a whit; others don't know the change is looming ( says PC...

One of science fiction's jobs is to give humanity a map of where we're headed. From Jules Verne to William Gibson, sci-fi authors have described their versions of the future, and how people might live in it. Those ideas came up in a recent conversation I had with Brian David Johnson , who works for Intel as a futurist — a title that gives him one of the tech world's cooler business cards. Johnson says that his job lies at the intersection of science fiction and science fact. With that in mind...

The Two-Way is formally off-duty for the Presidents' Day holiday. But not only does the news not take a holiday — often, holidays are the news. Here's a quick roundup of some of today's important and most-discussed stories: Syria is reinforcing its military in what seems to be a bid to control Homs. ( AP ) Sens. Lindsey Graham and John McCain are calling for the U.S. to arm the Syrian rebels. ( The Hill ) An ESPN editor who was accused of making a racial slur against the NBA's Jeremy Lin —...

Major League Baseball's spring training has begun, as catchers and pitchers have made their way to Florida and Arizona to prepare for the 2012 season. Games in the Grapefruit League and Cactus League won't begin until early March, when all players will report to camp. Storylines so far include young stars Buster Posey (who has now been asked not to block homeplate ) and Stephen Strasburg (who had Tommy John surgery ) making their returns to the San Francisco Giants and Washington Nationals,...

The Colbert Report is set to resume production Monday, after a hiatus last week brought on by concerns over the health of Stephen Colbert's mother, according to reports. Lorna Colbert, 91, lives in Charleston, S.C., where the Comedy Central star grew up. Colbert received a flood of well-wishers' thoughts on Twitter after his show abruptly ceased production for two days last week. Word eventually spread that Lorna Colbert was ailing, prompting many to offer their support. "My family and I...

Gary Carter, the former Major League Baseball catcher who helped the New York Mets win the 1986 World Series, has died of brain cancer at 57. In a career marked by tenacity — and the ability to hit homeruns — Carter was chosen for 11 All Star teams. Carter's heroics helped the Mets come back to an improbable victory in their epic World Series against Boston — he singled and scored a crucial run, moments before teammate Mookie Wilson hit a ball that rolled through the legs of the Red Sox' Bill...

Provocateur comedian Stephen Colbert is known for many things. Silence has not been among them — until now. An abrupt suspension in his Colbert Report's production schedule sparked rumors online Thursday, after Comedy Central said it would air reruns for three days this week. It seems the delay is due to a family emergency. The Wall Street Journal reports that Colbert "suspended production of his satirical comedy show temporarily because of an emergency in Mr. Colbert's family, according to...

Amanda Knox, the U.S. college exchange student who won an appeal to overturn her murder conviction in Italy last October, has signed a deal to write a memoir — for which she'll earn nearly $4 million, according to reports. According to the Media Decoder blog at The New York Times , "After a heated auction among publishing houses that stretched for days, HarperCollins bought the rights this week to publish Ms. Knox's book, which is expected to be a gripping account of her experiences in Italy....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2JVfAoyG4o Slogans for a Las Vegas restaurant called the Heart Attack Grill include "Taste worth dying for," and "Over 350 lbs? Eat for free!" But the burger joint's shtick of calling waitresses "nurses" — complete with skimpy uniforms — and serving "quadruple bypass" burgers collided with reality Saturday, when a patron suffered a heart attack while eating at the restaurant. Many in the restaurant — including its owner, "Doctor" Jon Basso, thought the incident...

The United States and five other nations are embarking on a new program to limit pollutants connected to global warming. But they're not targeting carbon dioxide with this effort — instead, they're looking at methane gas, and soot. NPR's Richard Harris filed this report for our Newscast desk: "Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says the U.S. is teaming up with Canada, Mexico, Sweden, Ghana and Bangladesh to get countries thinking about some potent contributors to climate change." "For example...

Audits of working conditions are under way at Foxconn's manufacturing plants in China, a key link in Apple's supply chain of iPhones, iPads and other devices. The effort will include visits to at least three sites, "each with more than 100,000 workers," says Auret Van Heerden, president of the Fair Labor Association . "So we've taken a representative sample of over 35,000 workers," Van Heerden tells All Things Considered co-host Robert Siegel, in an interview airing Wednesday. Questions about...

Britain has a drinking problem. And it's not just a question of alcoholism, but how the country should grapple with what some call an ingrained tradition and others call a $4.24 billion nightmare. That's how much the National Health Service says it pays each year in alcohol-related incidents. That figure was cited by Prime Minister David Cameron Wednesday, as he pledged to rid his country of "one of the scandals of our society." One of his answers to that problem is to send "booze buses" to...

Toyota and Ford won the most awards in the J.D. Power and Associates 2012 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study, which came out today. Vehicles made by Toyota led the way with eight awards, while Ford models received three. In general, vehicle dependability was the best since the study first began in 1990, according to J.D. Power . That's on the strength of a 13 percent gain from 2011 to 2012. The study compares the number of problems owners of three-year-old cars experience in the most recent 12...

The 2013 budget proposed by President Obama includes many cuts made to conform with new spending limits. But several arts and cultural institutions saw their allotment rise by about 5 percent in the proposed plan. The proposed spending of $1.576 billion — in a budget of $3.8 trillion — includes some good news for the Smithsonian Institution and the National Endowments for the Arts. For the Newscast desk, Elizabeth Blair filed this report: "NEA grants go to more than 2,000 nonprofits,...

Linsanity is buzzing through the sports world, as New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin has come off the bench to emerge as a star. The unlikely story of an NBA player of Taiwanese descent who attended Harvard — and who, at 6 feet 3 inches, outscored Kobe Bryant to beat the Lakers — has won him many admirers. There aren't many players like Lin. But in Utah, there's a man who knows something about what he's experiencing. Like Lin, Wat (for Wataru) Misaka is an Asian-American who became an unlikely...

The Westminster Kennel Club dog show is under way, and that means dogs are being pampered, brushed and cajoled to walk before the event's judges. First held in 1877, the Westminster show claims to be second only to the Kentucky Derby in terms of continuously held sporting events. We'll have news of the Best In Show winner later today. But it's a good time to note that on the same day the 2012 dog show officially began, a new tradition started out West, where the inaugural Golden Collar Awards...

Prices for gasoline are hitting record highs in France, where a gallon now costs more than $8 in some areas. That's the word from Eleanor Beardsley, who filed a report for our Newscast unit: "Prices are up because of problems with two of France's main oil suppliers. Nigeria is racked by civil unrest, and European Union sanctions bar France from importing oil from Iran." "A lower euro has also raised the price of gasoline because crude oil prices are denominated in dollars." "The head of Total...

When your products sell for more than $80 million, selling one of them is a big deal. Selling hundreds of them in one deal means they're probably feeling pretty good over at Boeing right now. The aircraft company has finalized a deal to sell 230 jets to Lion Air of Indonesia, with a total list price of $22.4 billion — a record for Chicago-based Boeing. The deal, which was first announced in November during President Obama's multi-country tour of Asia, includes 201 737 MAX jets and 29 of...

Technology is sometimes blamed for keeping us awake at night. The thinking is that devices like laptops, smartphones and tablets may have made entertainment TOO portable, putting games, videos and the Internet close at hand in the bedroom. But a batch of new apps and gadgets tries to push the pendulum the other way, by helping you improve the quality of your sleep. Problems with sleeping have been in the news here at NPR in recent months, whether the story is about sleep apnea , sleep...

A bill introduced in the Oklahoma Legislature has some folks scratching their heads, as it prohibits "the manufacture or sale of food or products which use aborted human fetuses." Since the bill was introduced late last week by State Sen. Ralph Shortey, a Republican from Oklahoma City, corners of the Internet have been buzzing with the news, as people try to figure out two things: 1) is this real; and 2) is there any reason the bill might be needed? News of the bill was first reported by the...

A member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen was buried in Arlington National Cemetery this morning, the same day that Red Tails , a film dramatizing the pilots' heroic feats, was released in U.S. theaters. During World War II, Luke Weathers Jr. "shot down two German fighter planes while escorting a damaged bomber to its base," the AP reports. Weathers' widow, Jacqueline Weathers, his children, and others attended Friday's funeral. Many attendees wore red ties and scarves to honor the veteran. As is...

Palestine might not seem like a breeding ground for race car drivers. After all, the area is dotted with checkpoints and roadblocks , hundreds of obstacles that can cramp a driver's ability to explore a car's limits. But that hasn't stopped a group of Palestinian women from driving very fast, winning races and making a name for themselves along the way. "'In Saudi Arabia, women are prevented from driving - here in Palestine we have women who drive race cars," says an official in the...

Search and rescue operations at the wreck of the Costa Concordia have resumed, after being halted for a third time, due to choppy waters and the partially submerged vessel's tendency to shift on the rocks near Italy's coast. BBC correspondent Luisa Baldini says the search has resumed , after being called off early Friday. Here's a roundup of recent developments in the story: From Italy, Sylvia Poggioli report for NPR's Newscast unit: "Sensors placed on the ship show it has shifted about an...

What if your New Year's resolution to get more exercise could be fulfilled — by taking a pill? That's the far-flung idea suddenly brought much closer to reality by the discovery of a hormone called irisin, which is produced by the human body in response to exercise. Irisin may hold some of exercise's key benefits that relate to obesity and Type 2 diabetes, researchers say. WBUR's CommonHealth blog has the story, which came out today thanks to a study in the journal Nature . CommonHealth's...

Parts of Nigeria are under a 24-hour curfew, after demonstrations against a government policy to end fuel subsidies turned into a fiery rampage in the city of Minna. The BBC reports that "hundreds of rioters set fire to government and political party offices and also targeted the homes of local politicians." The AP lays out the basics of how we got here : "President Goodluck Jonathan removed subsidies on Jan. 1 that had kept gasoline prices low for more than two decades. Overnight, prices at...

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