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Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

The state of Massachusetts is taking a new step in the fight against the opioid epidemic, filing a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma that also names the OxyContin maker's executives. The suit alleges the company and 16 of its current and former directors misled doctors and patients about the risks of its opioid-based pain medications.

Updated at 8:35 a.m. ET on Wednesday

High above the bustling streets of St. Paul, Minn., among monoliths of concrete and glass, a daring climber has defied the odds — and the altitude — to capture a city's heart.

It just happens that this little hero has paws.

The same day that President Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un held their historic summit in Singapore, several U.S. politicians and officials attended another, far less heralded ceremony just to the north: It was the dedication of a ritzy new complex for the American Institute in Taiwan, or AIT — and China wasn't happy about it.

In half a decade, the number of U.S. adults who are reading poetry has nearly doubled.

That's according to the results of a new survey by the National Endowment for the Arts, which announced Thursday that "as a share of the total U.S. adult population, this poetry readership is the highest on record over a 15-year period."

More than two years after an international tribunal convicted Jean-Pierre Bemba of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the former vice president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has seen those convictions overturned on appeal.

T.J. Oshie shares his father's name.

The Washington Capitals winger, born Timothy Leif Oshie, won his first NHL title Thursday night in Las Vegas — more than five years after his father, Tim, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani has extended a significant peace overture to the Taliban, unilaterally declaring an unconditional cease-fire with the militant Islamist group on Thursday. Ghani said the peace in Afghanistan will begin June 12 and will last for roughly a week as Muslims mark the end of Ramadan.

The cease-fire does not include al-Qaida or the Islamic State.

The first time a group of humans managed to scale El Capitan, a granite monolith rising 3,000 feet sheer from California's Yosemite Valley, it took at least 45 days of climbing over the course of about 18 months. In the six decades since, those who followed in their footholds lessened the time it takes to reach the top — but, with some rare exceptions, even the most seasoned climbers generally take several days to complete the trek.

On Wednesday, two men did it in under two hours.

For centuries in Scotland, it was illegal for gay or bisexual men to act on same-sex attractions. Sexual relations, kissing, even flirting — if a Scottish man did it even with a consenting partner, he risked arrest and public shame. By some estimates, thousands were prosecuted and convicted before the law was repealed in 1980.

Now, those men are about to see their records cleared.

The soccer match scheduled for Saturday between Israel and Argentina was to have little consequence, at least as far as the teams' standings were concerned. It was just an exhibition in Jerusalem, a way for Argentine players to get their legs warm before the World Cup and for Israeli fans to get a glimpse of such superstars as Lionel Messi.

Now Argentina has called off the game — and disputes over why, exactly, have shifted the confrontation from the soccer field to the international political arena.

Exactly one year ago Wednesday, rebel forces backed by the U.S. embarked on a last, massive campaign to dislodge the Islamic State from its de facto capital in Raqqa, Syria. It would take another four months to pry Raqqa from ISIS control.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Miss America is waving goodbye to its swimsuit competition, scrapping one of its most iconic elements in an attempt to shift the annual ceremony's emphasis from its longtime focus on contestants' physical beauty.

Updated at 2:20 a.m. ET Tuesday

For nearly a quarter century, Washington Capitals fans knew a simple, unchanging truth: If you were listening to a Caps game, you were listening to Ron Weber.

As Samuel Dabney told it, the whole thing began with pizza parlors.

Dabney, who generally went by Ted, and Nolan Bushnell had been working together at an electronics company called Ampex back in the mid-1960s, and Bushnell had an idea for a "carnival-type pizza parlor," Dabney recalled in 2012.

It's a milestone so common that it has become a Hollywood trope: The son packs his things, carries all those vestiges of his former life across the threshold of the front door and, with the unwavering encouragement of his parents, finally leaves their house to face the wider world.

It's a little less common for that son to be 30 years old — and still less common for his parents' "encouragement" to take the form of a court order.

But here we are.

When demonstrators gathered Wednesday in Nicaragua's capital, Managua, their stated intent was partly one of mourning: Thousands had filled the city's streets to for what they called "the mother of all marches" — to commemorate the country's Mother's Day, and to remember the dozens who are believed to have died in the violent weeks since unrest erupted against President Daniel Ortega's government in mid-April.

It was to be a moment of peaceful solidarity. It ended in bloodshed.

For a brief time Wednesday, Bill Browder was in Spanish custody. The London-based businessman and vocal Kremlin critic had been arrested in Madrid on what Browder says was a Russian warrant issued through Interpol.

Before Ireland voted Friday on whether to repeal its constitutional ban on abortion, many observers in the predominantly Catholic, traditionally conservative country expected a close result on the hotly contested question.

For a moment in Brazil, it seemed likely the strike that has interrupted the country's major thoroughfares for days on end might finally be headed for a resolution. President Michel Temer appeared to blink after a standoff with truck drivers' unions, announcing late Sunday that his government would comply with their central demand to reduce diesel prices.

Updated at 7:51 p.m. ET

Two exit polls in Ireland's referendum on abortion rights indicate that a majority of voters want to do away with a constitutional amendment that recognizes the "right to life of the unborn."

Updated at 9:58 a.m. ET

Harvey Weinstein surrendered Friday to authorities at a police station in New York City, where the former Hollywood megaproducer has been charged with rape and sexual misconduct.

Weinstein arrived early in the morning at the New York Police Department's 1st Precinct in Lower Manhattan, ushered into the station by law enforcement officers as members of the media crowded behind metal barriers. He kept his gaze lowered amid a barrage of shouted questions.

It took Italy's leading parties nearly three months of turbulent negotiations to hammer out a governing arrangement, but they've finally done it.

Guys, we get it. As another esteemed journalistic enterprise once said: It only Tuesday.

Updated at 5:27 p.m. ET

In the weeks since the Kilauea volcano began belching lava into Hawaii's residential areas, the fiery flow has destroyed dozens of structures and covered scores of acres on the Big Island. But authorities fear its destructive reach could ravage at least two more cornerstones of the state: its power supply and, a little less tangibly, its all-important tourism industry.

Updated at 1:30 a.m. ET

"How good can they be? Spoiler alert: Not Very Good."

That was one hockey writer's analysis of the Vegas Golden Knights back in July, not long after the expansion draft in which the brand-new franchise picked its roster from the dregs of other NHL teams. In other words, roughly 10 months before this Not Very Good ™ team (spoiler alert!) made the Stanley Cup final on Sunday.

Updated at 5:26 p.m. ET

A plane carrying more than 100 people crashed shortly after takeoff from Havana's José Martí International Airport. The plane, a Boeing 737, had been destined for the city of Holguín when it smashed into the wooded edge of a field midday Friday.

Editor's Note: This post contains graphic descriptions.

"At first we thought it was fireworks."

The months-long wave of teacher protests, which has rolled through roughly half a dozen states already, swelled and crashed on the front stoop of North Carolina's Capitol building Wednesday. Demonstrators donned red and gathered in the capital, Raleigh, to demand better pay and better school funding.

If Scott Pruitt arrived on Capitol Hill expecting to be grilled Wednesday, he did not have to wait long to see that expectation fulfilled.

Updated at 5:02 p.m. ET

The Gap has apologized for selling T-shirts that depicted what it called an "erroneous" map of China, which showed only the country's mainland — without several disputed regions that Beijing regards as Chinese territories. The U.S. clothing retailer announced that the T-shirt has been "completely withdrawn from the Chinese market and completely destroyed."

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