Michael Lyon

Morning Edition host and Events Calendar Coordinator

Michael Lyon says one of the questions he's asked most frequently is where he’s from. Actually, he's an Englishman, who has lived in the United States for about 30 years.  He describes himself as a vocal hybrid.

"I've always been a natural mimic and have for better or worse been drawn into assuming the speech patterns of the areas I've lived in.  I've even been asked whether English is my first language."

Michael came to Los Angeles in 1981.  He and his family moved to Omaha in 2000.

"My wife, is an Omaha native and when we were considering high school options for our son in 1999, it made sense to consider Omaha."

Michael's background is in business—he was vice president in the lending division of a large national bank—but from the mid-1980's through the late 1990's, he also pursued a career as a professional singer landing a host of leading roles in opera, oratorio and musical theater.  This background led him into radio, as programmer and host of a Sunday morning classical music program.  From there, it was a natural segue into hosting duties at KIOS-FM, as local anchor for NPR’s Morning Edition, every weekday morning for the past five years.

When not on the air, Michael, along with his wife, Kristin, are two of the area's leading Realtors, but he hasn't been able to forgo his musical calling. Always a fan of Big Band and Swing, he ventured into that music several years ago and has become one of the Midwest’s most in-demand performers. 

Ways To Connect

While hidden camera shows abound on reality TV, one of the biggest recent hits is “Impractical Jokers” with over two million viewers tuning in every Thursday night.

The Douglas County Health Department has reported the first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in a Douglas County resident. The patient was a child less than a year old who was hospitalized with coughing and difficulty breathing and later released.

Omaha Community Playhouse

 Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years is a touching, biographical, story that chronicles Bessie and Sadie's Delany’s struggles and triumphs over race and gender challenges. Veteran actors and real-life sisters Camille Metoyer Moten and Lanette Metoyer Moore sat down to give us an inside look at the play and how it parallels their own lives growing up in civil rights-era Omaha.  

The granddaughter of the famed Maria and Baron Von Trapp, whose story inspired The Sound of Music, performs a Yuletide concert Friday evening at the Holland Center.

An Omaha-based non-profit is working towards establishing MicroDemocracy and management of natural resources in South Sudan. 

A symposium this Friday in Kearney will cover energy-related education programs and their impact, meeting the needs of low-income energy consumers, and exploring how utilities and consumer outreach organizations can work together to find solutions to the challenges presented by energy costs.

National Bike to School Day celebrates the benefits of daily exercise and safe routes for kids.  It takes place this Wednesday across the state.

Will O'Leary 2005

Peabody-Award-winning journalist and host of NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, Scott Simon, will be the keynote speaker for Creighton University's Ross Horning Lecture on April 15.

As Alexander Payne returns to the state to film Nebraska, his next movie, a new book by Omaha author-journalist Leo Adam Biga provides a revealing look at the emergence and development of Omaha's favorite film director. Omaha Public Radio's Michael Lyon spoke with Biga about his new book.

United Way of the Midlands has set an ambitious goal to support “The Power of Change,” their fundraising drive over the next two months.  They announced the nearly $23.5 million goal and some special, one-time grants at a kickoff event August 29th.