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Author Interviews
4:08 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Box Of Love Letters Reveals Grandfather Didn't Escape WWII With 'Everyone'

cover crop
Riverhead

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 5:31 pm

Karl Wildman was the hero of his family — he escaped Vienna at the start of World War II and became a successful doctor in the United States. When Karl died, his granddaughter Sarah Wildman found a hidden trove of love letters from a woman Karl left behind in Vienna.

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Television
4:37 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

'Getting On' Star Niecy Nash: 'I Never Wanted To Be Funny'

Niecy Nash (right) plays DiDi, a nurse at an extended care facility, in the HBO comedy series Getting On, which was modeled after the hit BBC series of the same name. Betty Buckley plays one of her patients.
Lacey Terrell HBO

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 12:51 pm

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Code Switch
4:15 pm
Sun November 23, 2014

Racial Disparities In Arrests Are Prevalent, But Cause Isn't Clear

Protesters and law enforcement officers face off during a protest outside the Ferguson Police Department in October. Ferguson police statistics show the department arrest blacks at a higher rate than other racial groups — but that disparity is true for police departments across the country.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Mon November 24, 2014 11:00 am

Ferguson, Mo., continues to watch and wait as a grand jury decides whether to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Brown's death was the spark for mass protests in Ferguson, but many of the city's black population say the problems go deeper, and that blacks are unfairly singled out by police.

Ferguson police statistics show the department does arrest blacks at a higher rate than other racial groups. But that disparity is true for police departments across the country.

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The Two-Way
1:59 am
Sun November 23, 2014

Former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry Dies

Washington, D.C., Councilman and former Mayor Marion Barry was famously re-elected after going to jail for crack cocaine possession, but started out as a champion for the city's disenfranchised.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun November 23, 2014 12:28 pm

Marion Barry, the fiery Washington, D.C., politician who was famously re-elected after going to jail for crack cocaine possession, has died after months of battling health issues. He was 78.

The four-term mayor, who was still serving his third term on the D.C. Council, was famous for fighting for the District's disenfranchised, but won national notoriety after he was caught on FBI video with an ex-girlfriend and crack cocaine in 1990.

He was considered by many to be the district's most charismatic and controversial politician.

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Goats and Soda
7:43 am
Sat November 22, 2014

Obama's Step-Grandmother Continues Educating Young Kenyans

Sarah Obama, left, and her translator, Mama Sarah Obama Foundation Executive Director Debra Akello, spoke at the United Nations on Wednesday.
Bebeto Matthews AP

Originally published on Sat November 22, 2014 2:58 pm

The United States has seen many fundraisers headlined by an Obama in recent years, but this week it won't be the president or the first lady — it will be his step-grandmother, Sarah Obama, who is raising funds to build a school and hospital in her hometown, Kogelo, Kenya.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
3:49 pm
Thu November 20, 2014

Debate: Should Physician-Assisted Suicide Be Legal?

Bioethicist Peter Singer argues that, under certain circumstances, people should have the right to die at a time of their choosing.
Samuel La Hoz Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 4:17 pm

Since Oregon legalized physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill in 1997, more than 700 people have taken their lives with prescribed medication — including Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old with an incurable brain tumor, who ended her life earlier this month.

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Parallels
2:50 am
Mon November 17, 2014

In A Dutch Town, A Glowing Bike Path Inspired By Van Gogh

Artist Dan Roosegaarde pays tribute to Vincent Van Gogh's painting Starry Night by creating this bike path in Van Gogh's hometown of Eindhoven.
Courtesy of Studio Roosegaarde

Originally published on Mon November 17, 2014 11:27 am

In the Dutch town of Eindhoven, artist Daan Roosegaarde has paid homage to its most famous resident, Vincent Van Gogh, by creating a glowing bike path that relies on solar-powered LED lights and interprets his classic painting Starry Night.

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Around the Nation
5:50 pm
Sun November 16, 2014

Criminal Law Says Minors Can't Consent — But Some Civil Courts Disagree

Originally published on Sun November 16, 2014 8:00 pm

Protecting young people from sexual predators would seem to be a universally-held value in this country: No state has an age of consent lower than 16.

But in some courtrooms, attorneys argue that children can make decisions about whom they have sex with — and in some cases, those attorneys are winning.

One of those cases is currently under appeal in California. In 2010, a 28-year old middle-school math teacher began a six-month sexual relationship with a 14-year-old female student at his school.

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Goats and Soda
10:59 am
Sun November 16, 2014

Google Asks Users To Help Fight Ebola — And They Answer With Cash

Google CEO Larry Page.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sun November 16, 2014 11:26 am

When you think philanthropy, Facebook and Google don't usually come to mind.

But maybe in your travels across the Internet this week, you notice that both companies placed banners ads on their pages asking you to help end the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

Google pledged to match every dollar donated by its users with $2. The company has already reached its limit of $7.5 million — $5 million from Google and $2.5 million from donors.

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Music Interviews
4:52 pm
Sat November 15, 2014

When The Lights Go Down, Who Will Hear 'The Last Transmission'?

Filmmaker and musician Melvin Van Peebles' new album with the London band The Heliocentrics is titled The Last Transmission.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat November 15, 2014 8:35 pm

A lot of popular musicians in the 1960s and '70s showed a passionate interest in getting extremely high — higher than any human had ever been.

We're talking, of course, about space exploration. David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Sun Ra, Funkadelic; all contributed to our shared space mythology. That doesn't happen so much these days.

But a new record from London band The Heliocentrics is a welcome, and trippy, exception.

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