Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 4am - 9am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, and David Greene
  • Local Host Michael Lyon

Local News Update - 6:19am, 7:19am, 8:19am

Events Calendar - 8:45am

Marketplace Morning Report - 5:51am, 7:51am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today, Chrysler is expected to announce plans to add more than 1,000 jobs at an assembly plant in Ohio. Local officials there have reportedly signed off on tax incentives for the plant expansion in Toledo. It's where Chrysler makes the Jeep Liberty and Wrangler.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The last in a three-part series on thinkers who have had a lasting influence on economic policymakers. Other stories featured Ayn Rand and Friedrich Hayek.

Police officers removed Occupy Wall Street protesters from Zuccotti Park in New York City early Tuesday morning. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the operation took place at night to "reduce the risk of confrontation." But clashes erupted and about 70 people were arrested.

Police temporarily cleared Zuccotti Park early Tuesday so that sanitation crews could clean the site Occupy Wall Street protesters have inhabited for two months. About 70 protesters were arrested including some who chained themselves together.

Veterans Day was last week, and with it came a reminder of a World War 1 strategy. Britain's Daily Telegraph reported on the fake city France was creating in hopes German bombs wouldn't hit the real Paris. The sham city was never finished because the war ended.

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