Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 4am - 9am
with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Local News Update - 6:06am, 7:06am, 8:06am

Events Calendar - 8:30am

Marketplace Morning Report - 6:51am, 8:51am

 

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Around the Nation
6:35 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Robber Thwarted By Pot-Wielding Kitchen Worker

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Latin America
4:27 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Haiti's Quake Damaged National Palace To Be Razed

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Haiti plans to clear away a symbol of the country's devastation. The earthquake in 2010 ruined the National Palace, one of the most spectacular buildings in Port-au-Prince.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We've been looking at some recent photographs. They show the white building still standing, if barely. The earthquake did not knock down its elegant rows of columns. But the white dome on top was left sloping at a dangerous angle, the supporting walls half-crushed beneath its weight.

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Movies
4:23 am
Wed August 22, 2012

'Expendables 2'

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 5:41 am

The Expendables 2 — the movie starring a host of aging action heroes — opened at No. 1 over the weekend. Morning Edition commentator and Hollywood screenwriter John Ridley found the movie surprisingly stirring following last month's shootings in Aurora, Colorado.

Africa
4:23 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Ethiopian Prime Minister Zenawi Dies At 57

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 5:35 am

Prime Minister Meles Zenawi died in a Belgian hospital this week at the age of 57 after a long illness. He came to power in 1991 after leading a rebel army from Ethiopia's north and toppling the Marxist leader. He was viewed as a firm U.S. ally in the war on terrorism, but also was accused of human rights abuses in Ethiopia.

NPR Story
4:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Obama Highlights Steps To Affordable Education

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 6:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Battleground states are not always neighbors. And for President Obama, yesterday was one of those days when a candidate stops in one and flies across most of the entire country to another. Mr. Obama was in Ohio and then Nevada, visiting college campuses. This morning he'll keep with the education theme at a high school near Las Vegas. The president has been highlighting steps he's taken to make higher education more affordable.

Here's NPR's Scott Horsley.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: How many students do we have here?

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Law
4:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Jury To Decide Apple's Patent Case Against Samsung

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 3:10 pm

What your next smart phone or tablet computer might look like is in the hands of a California jury. In one of the biggest patent infringement cases ever, Apple is suing Samsung — charging that in creating its products, Samsung ripped off iPhone and iPad technology. Samsung countered with its own allegations.

This case is complex, the legal issues are daunting, and the jury's decision has to be unanimous.

"What's at stake here is the future of smartphones and the tablet market," says intellectual property expert Christopher V. Carani.

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NPR Story
4:11 am
Wed August 22, 2012

GOP Platform Committee Adopts Abortion Position

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 6:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

A deadline came and went yesterday and Todd Akin remains on the ballot for United States Senate in Missouri. On a radio program, the Republican said his party was overreacting in the effort to drive him out of the race.

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Middle East
2:06 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Syrian Conflict Stokes Unease In Lebanon

Lebanese masked gunmen from the al-Mokdad clan gather for a news conference in Beirut's southern suburbs on Aug. 15. The Mokdads, a large Lebanese Shiite Muslim clan, said they kidnapped at least 20 Syrians to try to secure the release of a family member abducted by Syrian rebels near Damascus this week.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 8:43 am

In Lebanon, a wave of kidnappings and an alleged plot to destabilize the country with bombings — both related to the uprising in Syria — are shaking Lebanon's precarious sectarian balance.

That's been apparent on al-Mokdad Street in south Beirut, which has been tense in recent days. The Mokdads are a large Shiite clan who control the street that is named for them. Young men with pistols in their pockets cruise the street on motor scooters, acting as the clan's lookouts.

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Around the Nation
2:05 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Trying To Tame The (Real) Deadliest Fishing Jobs

Crew members of a scallop boat float in their survival suits during a drill in Point Judith, R.I.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 3:09 pm

On the fishing-boat piers of New England, nearly everyone knows a fisherman who was lost at sea.

Boat captain Joe Neves remembers when a crew member got knocked overboard. "We heard him screaming 'Help me!' " Neves says, grimacing. "But you know, on the water at night, your head is like a little coconut." They didn't find him.

Mike Gallagher discovered a friend who was entangled in still-running hydraulics. "I knew right away he was dead," he says.

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It's All Politics
2:04 am
Wed August 22, 2012

Are Independents Just Partisans In Disguise?

Don Nichols iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 6:31 am

Independent voters have grown in recent years into a mega voting bloc. By some estimates they outnumber registered Republicans, and even registered Democrats.

Every election cycle, independents generate enormous amounts of interest as candidates, pollsters and the media probe their feelings. These voters are widely considered to hold the key to most elections.

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