Morning Edition

Monday - Friday 4am - 9am
with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Local News Update - 6:06am, 7:06am, 8:06am

Events Calendar - 8:30am

Marketplace Morning Report - 6:51am, 8:51am

 

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Election 2012
4:26 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Analysts Try To Define Romney's Foreign Policy

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, one way Mitt Romney has challenged President Obama is by going after his foreign policy record. Romney has been especially critical of the president's handling of Iran and Syria. But those attacks aside, some analysts say it's been hard to define where Romney stands on key international issues and whether he differs all that much from the president.

Here's NPR's Jackie Northam.

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Middle East
4:26 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Assad Deflects Blame In Houla Massacre

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's turn to Syria now. Syria's president gave his first public speech in five months yesterday. Bashar al-Assad told the Syrian Parliament that his government was not responsible for the massacre in Houla last month, in which more than 100 people were killed, nearly half of them children. Also, there is new Syria-related violence in northern Lebanon, near the Syrian border. And to talk about this we've reached NPR's Kelly McEvers.

Kelly, good morning.

KELLY MCEVERS, BYLINE: Good morning.

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Business
4:26 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with some good news for Spain.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Around the Nation
4:26 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Branson's Shows Go On Despite Tornado Damage

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The summer tourism season is what keeps Branson, Missouri thriving. Last year, Branson's live music venues helped draw more than seven million visitors. And so when a tornado tore through the city's popular strip this past February, Branson's future seemed uncertain. As Missy Shelton of member station KSMU reports, city leaders are working hard to let people know that Branson is open for business.

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Africa
1:48 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Some Taboos Vanish In Tunisia, Replaced By Others

Since the revolution last year, Tunisians have had greater freedom to express their opinions on political and social issues. But the rise of Islamist groups has made religion a more sensitive topic. Here, two men chat at a cafe in the capital Tunis.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:49 am

Over the next couple weeks, NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep will be taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves as they write new social rules, rebuild their economies and establish new political systems. Steve and his team will be traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
1:45 am
Mon June 4, 2012

A Waiting Game For Homeowners Trying To Sell Short

Cathy Yamauchi has been waiting since Thanksgiving to hear from her mortgage lender regarding a short sale of her home in Ramsey, Minn. She is planning to move to a townhome, but is mostly living out of boxes while waiting on the short sale.
Jennifer Simonson MPR

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Banks are often accused of dragging their feet when a homeowner wants to sell for less than the balance on the mortgage. A lot of those "short sales" might be better dubbed "really long and drawn out" sales. New federal guidelines, though, could now push lenders to approve short sales faster.

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Shots - Health Blog
1:43 am
Mon June 4, 2012

What's Different About The Brains Of People With Autism?

Jeff Hudale, who is autistic, demonstrates a face recognition test at the University of Pittsburgh in 2010. Researchers use eye tracking devices to monitor and record what he is looking at.
Rebecca Droke Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 12:21 pm

Like a lot of people with autism, Jeff Hudale has a brain that's really good at some things.

"I have an unusual aptitude for numbers, namely math computations," he says.

Hudale can do triple-digit multiplication in his head. That sort of ability helped him get a degree in engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. But he says his brain struggles with other subjects like literature and philosophy.

"I like working with things that are rather concrete and structured," he says. "Yeah, I like things with some logic and some rules to it."

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Science
1:42 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Summer Science: How To Build A Campfire

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Summer living is supposed to be easy — school is out, the days are long, the traffic eases. But it's not all inner tubes and lemonade: Summer can throw us some curveballs, too. How can I avoid sunburn? What can I do to stave off that brain freeze? Why do my s'mores always burn?

Fear not; NPR is here to help. As part of our new Summer Science series, we'll turn to science to tackle these vexing questions, starting with how to build the perfect campfire.

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Event Interviews
10:46 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Omaha Symphony’s New Music Symposium Concert

The Omaha Symphony's New Music Symposium called for scores for original works for chamber orchestra. Four young composers were selected to participate, working with Pulitzer Prize and Grammy-award winning composer William Bolcom and other faculty over the course of three days to refine and rework their original compositions.  You can hear these compositions at a public concert at 7:00 p.m. tonight at Kaneko, 1111 Jones Street, Omaha.

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Law
8:04 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Court Rules Against Part Of Marriage Act

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Friday, it is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

In a unanimous ruling, a federal appeals court has struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act. The First Circuit Court of Appeals, in Boston, ruled the 1996 law unconstitutional because it denies giving gay couples the same rights afforded to heterosexual couples. As NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports, the ruling sets the stage for a potential battle at the U.S. Supreme Court.

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