History

Creating Camelot exhibit comes to Omaha's Durham Museum

Feb 19, 2016

A new exhibit at Omaha’s Durham Museum takes you in to the personal life and presidential campaign of John F. Kennedy.

A new exhibit at Omaha’s Durham Museum takes you to the Wild West, and the world of Buffalo Bill.

UNO plans to offer a minor in Holocaust and Genocide Studies starting this spring.

The great-great-grandson of author Charles Dickens will be in Omaha this week to perform one of his most famous works.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A historic streetcar barn is among two Omaha sites that have been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

MILFORD, Neb. (AP) — A Lincoln man is biking his way over the route the Ponca people were forced to march from Nebraska to Oklahoma in 1877.

Governor's Lecture in the Humanities focuses on World War One

Oct 7, 2015

World War One left a mixed legacy for President Woodrow Wilson and lessons for future leaders, according to a British historian.

Katie Knapp Schubert / KIOS-FM

About one million World War Two veterans are still alive---and a 96-year-old female veteran of that war spoke at UNO last week.

Second Sunday talk looks at Ft. Omaha role in WW1

Mar 5, 2014

An event this weekend in Omaha focuses on the city’s role in training for World War 1.

Events, culture, history of 1968 coming to Omaha's Durham Museum

Jan 30, 2014
Katie Knapp Schubert / KIOS-FM

An exhibit opening next week at Omaha’s Durham Museum takes visitors month-by-month through 1968.

More than 50 black and white photographs of civil rights leaders are on view at the Loves Jazz and Art Center through August 25th.

Selma to Montgomery: Marching Along the Voting Rights Trail is being offered as a lead-in to the November elections.  Photos of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Harry Belafonte, and Ralph Abernathy are included in the exhibit.  Program Director Janet Ashley says the photographs offer visitors the opportunity to see and feel an important moment in our nation’s history.

The Durham Museum is offering visitors the opportunity to see one of the top 100 most significant documents in our nation’s history.

Shawna Forsberg, Durham Marketing Director, says original pages of the Pacific Railway Act are on view at the museum through the end of this month.  President Abraham Lincoln signed the Pacific Railway Act on July 1, 1862, establishing Union Pacific Railroad Company. 

The 1879 trial of Omaha Chief Standing Bear was the subject of last month’s press club.

Award winning author, college professor, and former newsman Joe Starita was the guest speaker.  Starita wrote I AM A MAN, which detailed the landmark case of Chief Standing Bear.  He said the case stemmed from the U.S. government forcing the Ponca Indians from their ancestral land, and Chief Standing Bear’s efforts to lead some of them back.

Homestead Act turns 150

May 22, 2012
courtesy National Archives

Sunday was the 150th anniversary of the Homestead Act.

The act, signed in 1862 by President Abraham Lincoln, offered 160 acres of free land to anyone who was the head of a household or at least 21 years old. The landowner had to develop the land and grow crops within five years. The only costs associated with acquiring the land were filing fees of $18.

photo by Katie Schubert/KIOS-FM

A foundation seeking to expand the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail will have its headquarters in Omaha.

National Park Service officials on Thursday announced the formation of the Lewis and Clark Trust. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark’s two-year expedition from Illinois to Washington is documented along what is now the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail.

Herbert Karliner, Philip Freud, Hans Fisher and Sol Messinger will present a special lecture at the Durham Museum on Friday morning at 10:30.

The four men are survivors of the tragic 1939 voyage of the SS St. Louis.  After trying to dock in several countries, including the U.S., the ship was forced to return to Europe.  

Many passengers subsequently found themselves under Nazi rule, and many died as a result. The majority of the passengers that were granted refuge in Great Britain survived the ordeal.  Shawna Forsberg is Director of Marketing for the Durham.

Courtesy of Creighton University

In honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day Thursday, Creighton University in collaboration with the Omaha Jewish Community, will present the original docudrama, “The Trial of Franklin D. Roosevelt.” The docudrama is about the 1939 voyage of the SS St. Louis. 900 Jewish men, women and children were adrift at sea for 30 days and were denied entrance into the U.S.  

The passengers were told the United States had reached its immigrant quota, so they were sent back to Germany and other European countries, many of them occupied by Germany.  

A series of events this month in Omaha highlight the contributions women have made to Nebraska.

March is Womens History Month. The Omaha Public Library branches are hosting lectures on the role of women in politics, history, and civil liberties.

OPL executive director Gary Wasdin says one presentation, scheduled for March 22nd at the library’s Florence Branch, will focus on the role of women pioneers in the 1870s and 1880s.  

Federal judge Laurie Smith Camp will speak at the downtown branch on March 25th about women and civil liberties.

UNO is celebrating Black History Month with three public events.

Helen Kang is the Assistant Director for Cultural Programming at UNO.  She says the process of choosing events begins with reaching out to student and community groups.  After the Black History Month committee is formed, the brainstorming session begins.