missouri river

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Omaha, Bellevue and Sarpy County will be asked to pay more than $2 million each for levee repairs around Offutt Air Force Base.

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It was 150 years ago that the steamboat Bertrand sank in the Missouri River north of Omaha.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — More rainfall than expected flowed into the Missouri River last month, but the river's reservoirs still have plenty of room because of this year's below-average snowfall.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska cities along the Missouri River are still waiting for nearly $7.2 million to be reimbursed from state and federal agencies, more than 3 years after a 2011 flood.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The list of landowners suing the federal government over major flooding along the Missouri River since 2006 has grown considerably.

RULO, Neb. (AP) — Officials are asking that residents of the southeastern Nebraska town of Rulo evacuate as the Missouri River swells to flood stage.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The federal government says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers shouldn't be blamed for causing major flooding along the Missouri River.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Omaha Public Power District officials say it will reduce power as it prepares for rising water on the Missouri River.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is preparing to cut releases from Gavins Point Dam to winter levels.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says drought conservation measures will remain in place along the Missouri River basin.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — More than $180 million worth of repairs to Missouri River levees battered by the historic 2011 flooding are winding down. But critics complain the work is taking too long to complete.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Businesses that move products on the Mississippi River continue to seek the government's help as the river approaches historic lows.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and Missouri U.S. Senator Roy Blunt are joining the chorus expressing concern over the Army Corps of Engineers plan to reduce flow from an Missouri River reservoir, potentially affecting shipping on the Mississippi River.

Record low inflows in to the Missouri River basin in September

Oct 8, 2012

This year’s severe drought caused record low inflows in September in the Missouri River basin.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says runoff from the six dams that feed the Missouri River will be below normal the rest of the year.

In a news release, Corps officials say the July runoff forecast shows below-normal runoff for the rest of 2012. It’s at 87-percent of normal north of Sioux City.

Jody Farhat, chief of the Omaha District’s Water Management Division, says the lower runoff means normal operating conditions. It won’t affect the navigation season, which ends November 24th at Omaha.

The Missouri River is expected to drop nearly three feet at Omaha at the end of this week as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers inspects Gavins Point Dam.

New levee being built along Missouri River near Nebraska City

Mar 30, 2012
courtesy Des Moines Register/Google Images

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to build a new, three-mile long levee near Nebraska City.

The $12.9 million project will re-align levee L-575 along Highway 2. It’ll be built further away from the Missouri River than the existing section of levee. Once it’s built, the existing levee at that location in Fremont County, Iowa, will be torn down. The Corps of Engineers awarded a contract earlier this week for the levee setback project.

Corps of Engineers to hold seven public meetings in April

Mar 28, 2012
courtesy Google Images

 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will hold seven public meetings next month in cities along the Missouri River.

The meetings will be held April 16th through 20th. Each is an opportunity for the public for hear from Northwest District officials about this year’s runoff season. The 2012 runoff season began March first.

Omaha’s meeting is April 18th at the Marriott. It begins at 6 PM.

Army Corps of Engineers officials say so far, this year’s Missouri River runoff season appears normal.

Western Iowa residents forced out of their homes by Missouri River flooding may have another option for temporary housing.

Iowa Finance Authority spokeswoman Ashley Jared says flood victims can apply for a waiver to live in housing usually restricted by the federal government to low-income families.

Jared says the waiver applies to flood victims in Monona, Harrison, Pottawattamie, Mills, and Fremont counties. People who lived in those counties between May 25th and August first of 2011 can apply for the housing waiver.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says additional storage space will be available in the six Missouri River main stem reservoirs this spring.

During a biweekly conference call Friday, Corps officials discussed conditions going in to the start of the spring runoff season, which begins March first. Jody Farhat, Chief of the Omaha District’s Water Management Division, says plains and mountain snowpack are below this time last year.