Missouri River Flooding

stories from the post-MO River flooding. Includes Corps of Engineers stories, levee repairs, etc.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The list of landowners suing the federal government over major flooding along the Missouri River since 2006 has grown considerably.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The federal government says the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers shouldn't be blamed for causing major flooding along the Missouri River.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A group of farmers and business owners is suing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, claiming the agency mismanaged the Missouri River since 2006 and contributed to major flooding in five states.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — More than $180 million worth of repairs to Missouri River levees battered by the historic 2011 flooding are winding down. But critics complain the work is taking too long to complete.

The US Army Corps of Engineers will begin a spillway slab repair project at Gavins Point Dam this month.

Repairs to Omaha's levee system nearing completion

Nov 9, 2012
Katie Schubert / KIOS-FM

More than a year after severe flooding devastated areas along the Missouri River, repairs to Omaha’s levee system are nearly complete.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The public will have a chance to get another update on the status of the troubled Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant at a meeting in Blair next month.

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) — Council Bluffs officials say the Missouri River flooding last year will cost the city about $4.5 million.

Last summer at this time, Nebraska and Iowa were in the grips of major flooding along the Missouri River. Now, a small southwest Iowa community hopes to make permanent a levee that protected them from the river. Omaha Public Radio's Deborah Newcombe takes us there.

More information about Hamburg's efforts is available at The Omaha District of the U-S Army Corps of Engineers estimates it'll cost 280-million dollars to repair all the damage caused by last year's flooding will cost 280-million dollars.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says runoff from the six dams that feed the Missouri River will be below normal the rest of the year.

In a news release, Corps officials say the July runoff forecast shows below-normal runoff for the rest of 2012. It’s at 87-percent of normal north of Sioux City.

Jody Farhat, chief of the Omaha District’s Water Management Division, says the lower runoff means normal operating conditions. It won’t affect the navigation season, which ends November 24th at Omaha.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials say more than $100 million dollars worth of levee repair work has been done following last year’s Missouri River flooding.

Omaha and Kansas City District officials updated the post-flood repairs during a conference call Friday. Last summer’s flooding along the Missouri River caused significant damage in Nebraska and Iowa.

11 levee repair projects underway along Missouri River

Jun 5, 2012
courtesy Google Images

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hopes to have all Missouri River levee repair projects complete by the end of this year.

Corps officials updated the status of levee repairs during a conference call Tuesday. Last summer’s Missouri River flooding caused significant damage in Nebraska and western Iowa. The Corps’ Omaha District has 11 levee repair projects underway, with $99 million dollars in repairs complete.

The Missouri River is expected to drop nearly three feet at Omaha at the end of this week as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers inspects Gavins Point Dam.

New levee being built along Missouri River near Nebraska City

Mar 30, 2012
courtesy Des Moines Register/Google Images

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to build a new, three-mile long levee near Nebraska City.

The $12.9 million project will re-align levee L-575 along Highway 2. It’ll be built further away from the Missouri River than the existing section of levee. Once it’s built, the existing levee at that location in Fremont County, Iowa, will be torn down. The Corps of Engineers awarded a contract earlier this week for the levee setback project.

Corps of Engineers to hold seven public meetings in April

Mar 28, 2012
courtesy Google Images


The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will hold seven public meetings next month in cities along the Missouri River.

The meetings will be held April 16th through 20th. Each is an opportunity for the public for hear from Northwest District officials about this year’s runoff season. The 2012 runoff season began March first.

Omaha’s meeting is April 18th at the Marriott. It begins at 6 PM.

Army Corps of Engineers officials say so far, this year’s Missouri River runoff season appears normal.

Photo by Katie Schubert, KIOS-FM

The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District is contributing $2 million toward additional upgrades and a study of Omaha’s levee system.

The study is required for FEMA recertification of the levee system. That’s separate from what’s done by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. FEMA began requiring levee certifications after Hurricane Katrina.

2012 spring runoff season begins

Mar 7, 2012
courtesy Google Images

The 2012 spring runoff season is underway along the Missouri River.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials say releases from Gavins Point Dam averaged 22,000 cubic feet per second during February. It’ll stay at that level through the middle of this month, and then increase for the start of the navigation season. Last year’s record runoff season led to devastating flooding along the Missouri River in Nebraska and Iowa.

OPPD officials say the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Station won’t reopen until they’re confident safety issues at the plant are resolved.

Utility leaders met in Washington, D.C., Wednesday with the NRC to update performance issues at the plant. Fort Calhoun Station has been closed since last April. Since then, the NRC has cited OPPD for multiple violations at the plant, including being ill-prepared for a flood. NRC officials say a fire at the plant last June also wasn’t reported within the required time frame.

courtesy Google Images

The leader of the Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District believes the agency is better prepared in the event of flooding this year.

About 70 emergency managers and levee sponsors gathered Tuesday in Omaha for the annual Missouri River flood fight preparedness training. Last year’s Missouri River flooding inundated farms, businesses, and homes in western Iowa for more than three months.

Western Iowa residents forced out of their homes by Missouri River flooding may have another option for temporary housing.

Iowa Finance Authority spokeswoman Ashley Jared says flood victims can apply for a waiver to live in housing usually restricted by the federal government to low-income families.

Jared says the waiver applies to flood victims in Monona, Harrison, Pottawattamie, Mills, and Fremont counties. People who lived in those counties between May 25th and August first of 2011 can apply for the housing waiver.

Levee repair projects underway near Bellevue, Nebraska CIty

Feb 17, 2012

Two more levee repair projects are underway south of Omaha following last summer’s Missouri River flooding.

The Corps of Engineers says a $43,000 contract was awarded for seeding along the levee from Bellevue to Plattsmouth. A $4.7 million repair project is also underway five miles south of Nebraska City.

Brett Budd, chief of the Omaha District’s Systems Restoration Team, says the work south of Nebraska City involves repairing scour holes and installing a seepage berm. He says the entire project will be complete by June first.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says additional storage space will be available in the six Missouri River main stem reservoirs this spring.

During a biweekly conference call Friday, Corps officials discussed conditions going in to the start of the spring runoff season, which begins March first. Jody Farhat, Chief of the Omaha District’s Water Management Division, says plains and mountain snowpack are below this time last year.